Why the Danish test pilot who survived the crash of a Norwegian Airbus A330 test flight is so dangerous

Why the Danish test pilot who survived the crash of a Norwegian Airbus A330 test flight is so dangerous

The pilot of a Danish Airbus A300 test flight who was killed in a crash with another Airbus on June 1 is one of the most dangerous pilots in the world, the National Transportation Safety Board said Friday.

The pilot, Michael Jonsson, 45, was the second person to be killed in the crash, after the Germanwings pilot Andreas Lubitz.

He had previously been the captain of an Airbus A320 that crashed in February, killing all 145 people on board.

The crash happened at 7:34 p.m. local time (1634 GMT) while the plane was flying at a speed of more than 500 miles per hour.

A second plane crashed in the southern French city of Toulouse about an hour later.

In a statement, the NTSB said the A300 pilot and his colleague were flying the Airbus A310 that was carrying a pilot and crew of about 70 people when the plane crashed.

An Airbus A350, which was heading from Barcelona to London, was also involved in the accident.

The flight was over France when the Airbus collided with a Germanwings jetliner.

According to a preliminary report, the A330 was heading for the French Alps.

Germanwings Flight 4U9525 crashed into mountains in northern France on March 19 after taking off from Barcelona.

Lubitz and the pilot were on a routine flight, the Danish safety board said.

“The pilot had been training for the previous two months on a Boeing 777-200ER aircraft,” the NTSBs statement said.

“The pilot was a pilot of more experienced experience and, in the case of Lubitz, had also been in the cockpit of a Boeing 737.”

Lukas Lunde, the head of the national aviation safety agency in Denmark, said in a statement that Lubitz had been working on the A310, and that the two pilots were “in good health.”

“They were well-equipped with basic equipment, including air brakes and anti-skid systems,” Lunde said.

The NTSB did not say what Lubitz was training for.

Investigators found evidence of a crash-engine failure, but said they did not know what caused it.

Air traffic controllers at Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport and Rome Rome International Airport, which are part of France’s international air traffic control system, said the plane had gone out of control before the crash.

There were no reports of injuries or damage to the plane.

The Airbus was operated by the French airline Lufthansa, and it was flying from Berlin to London.

Earlier Friday, Lubitz’s family said in an email that he was “in shock” and “broken.”

“He was such a loving father, friend, and a person of incredible courage, we have lost our father,” they said.

Lubitzer’s family had previously said he was a “good friend” of Lubitzer’s father, and they said the pilot’s “fiery courage” in the days before the accident was “like a ray of sunshine.”

Investigators are working to determine what caused the plane to crash.

The National Transportation Security Board is investigating the crash with the help of the German Federal Criminal Police Office.

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