A look at the $20.7 million Australian bank has lost in bitcoin trading on BATS test certificate

A look at the $20.7 million Australian bank has lost in bitcoin trading on BATS test certificate

The BATS (Bitstamp) test certificate was issued by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) in June 2016, with the aim of testing bitcoin exchanges to identify weaknesses.

The certificate is used by more than 500 financial institutions, including banks, to monitor trading activity.

BATS says its testing of bitcoin exchanges across the country was designed to identify whether trading volume has increased in recent months.

ASIC says the test certificate has only been used to identify potential weaknesses in bitcoin exchanges.

ASIC has not yet released the results of the testing, but a spokesperson said in a statement: “The test certificate is designed to test the performance of bitcoin trading platforms in relation to their existing protocols, and not necessarily the underlying technology used by a particular exchange.”

BATS said the test was used to test whether trading volumes on exchanges in Australia were increasing in recent weeks.

ASIC is also considering whether it should consider issuing a test certificate for bitcoin trading at a later date.

However, the bank’s chief executive has told investors the test would not be used to help its customers in the event of a major crash in bitcoin.

“The tests are a tool for us to make sure we’re in a safe environment for our customers and to make certain that we’re prepared to deal with any future disruptions,” Ian Narev told analysts.

The bank has not disclosed what it has been testing, and its statement did not mention any of the exchanges that have been flagged by the bank as being vulnerable.

Bitcoin is the world’s most popular digital currency.

It was created in 2009 by a group of computer scientists using the pseudonymous name Satoshi Nakamoto, who said he had created the digital currency to combat corruption in the global financial system.

However the currency has since fallen out of favour due to the increasing popularity of rival cryptocurrencies, such as Litecoin and Dogecoin.

Bats has said it has received “no requests” for the test to be used, but said it was considering whether to do so.

The test was also used by banks to identify which of their customers had “invalid” test certificates.

ASIC said that while the test certificates had been issued to banks for use in testing bitcoin, the agency was not considering any of its customers as being at risk.

“This test is intended for testing only those bitcoin exchanges that are identified to be at risk of any potential risk to the financial system by the testing,” ASIC said in the statement.

“A bank’s failure to identify any bitcoin exchange at risk could result in the test issuing a certificate to a bitcoin exchange that is not at risk, and the bank may lose the test certification.”

However, it added that the bank had not yet received any requests from banks to conduct the test.

ASIC’s investigation of bitcoin was triggered by the BATS incident.

ASIC had been conducting its own investigation into the Bats test certificate, but decided to pursue its own inquiry because of the “significant” nature of the problem, ASIC’s statement said.

“Bats is a significant issue for ASIC and ASIC is currently undertaking its own independent investigation to determine the cause of the issue,” it said.

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